These Five Language Hacks Will Improve Your Call Center Customer Service

These Five Language Hacks Will Improve Your Call Center Customer Service

Customer service is all about response and engagement. Whether you’re handling complaints or outreach, your choice of words determine the outcome. This is more important in call center customer service; focus on tone and phrasing, because even your pauses have meaning. It’s fortunate you can develop customer service with training and practice.

You want to convey your best interest during the conversation. You’ve composed your email and reviewed the spiels to use on the campaign. Are you putting your clients’ best interests as priority? Consider these five language adjustments if you want to improve engagement and service:

1. Use “We” And “I” Appropriately

The trick is to use “I” when you’re bearing responsibility, “we” when you want to reassure clients their concerns will be resolved. Approach each engagement like you’re part of the team, even if you’re the one doing all the legwork. You’ll send an impression everyone is on board towards reaching a resolution, and your clients consider you part of the company instead of a lone representative.

Use “I” sparingly, and only when you’re assuming responsibility for a problem. Sometimes you’ll be tempted to use this pronoun when taking credit: don’t. You’re better off sharing the kudos to the team.

2. Use “I Don’t” Instead Of “I Can’t”

Starting your sentence with “I can’t” conveys helplessness, an inability to resolve the client’s concern. Isn’t solution the goal of support? In call center customer service, “I can’t” negates your efforts to build rapport with your customer. Remember, there’s always something you can do to resolve a problem, including escalating it to an immediate superior.

Using “I don’t” in your response means you’re decisive, proactive. It also confirms you’re on top of the situation. Offer alternatives to your client if you cannot accommodate the preferred option.

3. “Value” Is Crucial In Call Center Customer Service

Nothing relays you value your clients than explicitly saying you value them. In heated complaints, this is reassurance you’re exerting effort towards resolution. It’s hard to show empathy over the phone or through email, apart from explicitly saying what you mean, straightforward and concise.

Say “I value your concern,” or “we want you to know you’re a valued customer.” Make sure you deliver to the statement in the meantime, though, take steps to ensure you’re in progress with solutions.

4. “I apologize” Instead Of “I’m Sorry”

There’s subtle difference between the two phrases. It’s similar to the efficiency of “I don’t” over “I can’t.” For starters, “I’m sorry” is too casual and familiar, the phrase you use when you have no solution left to offer. On the other hand, “I apologize” hints you’re accountable to the mishap, and you’re taking responsibility for the consequence.

“I apologize” is also diplomatic compared to “I’m sorry.” You’re owning up to the fault, but you’re not resigned to finish the conversation with offering the best, alternative solution.

5. Use “Sincerely” In Valediction

Do you ever struggle when it comes to closing your conversation, correspondence? What are your stock phrases when signing off on your letter? It turns out some phrases leave better impressions than others, and “Sincerely,” is the best way to sign off the conversation.

Adapt your language to your relationship with your recipient; a hint of familiarity is often best, especially in call center customer service. “Best regards,” “best wishes,” and “yours truly” are good finishers, but nothing beats “sincerely” in clarity and brevity.

Language is your first tool in customer relations. If you’re into the business of people, it’s crucial you use it with precision. Implement these hacks regularly and you’ll notice an improvement in customer feedback, retention, and acquisition.